foshy.co.uk

A combination of bookmarks and a blog. Just for me. Feel free to browse. Contact me: rich(one of those at symbol thingys)foshy.co.uk

Tags (by frequency): photo  processing  video  music  humour  news  wales  poetry  books  turkey  afyon  denbighshire  art  tv  llangollen  fuji velvia  world music  hampshire  norwich  cartoon  b&w 

Swirled series - 03.12.2020

   video  processing

Make an animation starting with a chess board and finishing with a chess board in a maximum of 180 frames. That was the brief on a twitter thread recently. There were some very clever entries.

Craig S. Kaplan collected and assembled all the submissions into the video shown here (a huge amount of work, read his article if you're interested). His website is a good place to view - you can change the speed of the animations and the quality of the display is better.


Processing patterns - 02.12.2020

   processing

I first got a computer back in the early 1980s - a Sinclair Spectrum. You either copied programs from magazines by typing them in on the little rubber keyboard, or loaded saved programs from a cassette tape. After doing both of these for a few weeks, I started to read the manual and slowly learned a little programming in Sinclair Basic.

This was the first thing I made which ran successfully. Just drawing a line which followed a sort of square spiral and relying on a drawing function which only turns on a pixel if the original pixel is blank. It's fascinating watching simple rules produce complex outcomes. It was one of the first things I tried to reproduce when I discovered the processing language.

Play with the code here.


Afyonkarahisar - 26.09.2014

   photo  turkey  afyon

An image of an Afyonkarahisar street


Llangollen church - 02.05.2019

   photo  wales  llangollen

Llangollen: a church by the water


Hitomezashi stitching - 01.12.2020

   processing

sample1 Hitomezashi stitching - wow! It's a variant of the Japenese sashiko embroidery technique which produces inticate patterns. According to Wikipedia: "Coming into existence in the Edo period (1615-1868), sashiko embroidery was first applied to clothing out of a practical need, and would have been used to strengthen the homespun clothes of olden times."

Annie Perkin's (@anniek_p) twitter posts explain that the stitches can be decided in many ways: at random, using your favourite numbers in binary, whatever you please. They can be symmetric or not. Whichever you prefer. Colouring in the areas between the stitches makes for interesting patterns. Have a go yourself with my app what I made (not so good for mobile use):